Saturday, December 6, 2008

Upside Down Tomato Garden

I like to garden. My past attempts have all been unsuccessful. There was the cactus in my dorm room, the herb garden on my West Village windowsill, and the Chia pet I had when I was five. I attribute these failures to the fact that all of these plants were indoors. Indoors means no rain, which means plants are entirely dependent on me for sustenance (which is also the reason the fish tank in my Brookyn apartment didn't work out so well).

I've discovered the secret to urban gardening: outdoor space. Now that I live in San Francisco, I have a patio, which means I have unfettered access to rain. Now the plants I have are harder to kill. I still have to water them, but they're less likely to die in the off chance I forget. In fact, I think they're stronger than other plants because I haven't pampered them.

I think I'm ready to grow my own food. I will start with tomatoes, because home-grown tomatoes and delicious, and because this Upside Down Tomato Garden was featured in SkyMall.

If you buy me this tomato garden, I will grow tomatoes on the bottom and herbs that complement tomatoes on the top. Then I will invite you over in a few months to enjoy some spaghetti and meatballs (or tofu balls if you're one of those vegetarian people). Unless there's a drought. No rain = upside down dead tomatoes.


Upside Down Tomato Garden

1 comment:

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